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Santa Closes Coal Plant for Good!

December 22, 2015
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Santa Closes Coal Plant for Good!
(North Pole) – Major changes for Christmas this year, as Santa closes the centuries old coal plant at the North Pole. Parents and children around the world will be enjoying a much greener and cleaner Christmas from now on with toys made with responsibly produced electricity and without coal in their stockings.
Santa ClausFor years, coal has been easily accessible and cheap for Santa to use in powering his toyshop at the North Pole and giving leftover coal to children on the Naughty list. Making the shift to renewable energy to power the toyshop, Santa says embracing solar and wind power for his energy needs “is the way of the future.” People around the globe are being advised to learn from Santa’s choices and include renewable energy on their Christmas lists this year.

“It’s a great way to lower the rising price of energy bills,” says Mrs. Claus, “and it’s better for everyone.”

Green Gifts
By closing the North Pole Coal Plant for good, Santa is also changing his “gifts” for naughty children from lumps of coal to local rocks. Elf Sam comments, “Local rocks are in greater supply, can be picked up conveniently at each home, won’t overburden the reindeer, and are a much more green, sustainable gift encouraging children to be good the coming year.” He also thinks it’s great that Santa is going to be “rocking the rocks” instead of carrying coal.

Santa is a Role Model to All
“We think this is a great time for people to learn from Santa and take control of their energy supply by installing solar panels on their homes”, comments Geoff Greenfield, President of Third Sun Solar, “Many families are unaware of the savings they could enjoy by going solar. Since the panels don’t require direct sunlight to work, there is still electricity generating on a cloudy day.” “Though,” says Michelle Greenfield, “Santa’s going to have to be a little more careful where he parks the sleigh from now on!”

Santa is being applauded for his dedication to reversing climate change and the impact he is making by switching to renewable energy. The North Pole is already enjoying the benefits of free power and Santa hopes they can be a positive influence on the rest of the world.

 

About Third Sun Solar
Based in Athens, Ohio, Third Sun Solar is a fast-growing design/build solar photovoltaic firm serving Ohio and surrounding states. Recognized as an Inc. 5000 Five-Year Honoree company, Third Sun Solar is at the forefront of the emerging clean energy industry—a growing resource for 21st-century Ohio jobs. For 15 years, the company has custom designed and installed over 400 solar energy systems for its commercial, institutional, government, and residential customers across the Midwest, generating more than 9 megawatts of energy in pursuit of the goal of bringing solar energy into the residential and commercial mainstream. Third Sun Solar employs a team of NABCEP-certified solar energy system installers along with design engineers, financial analysts, grant specialists, and support staff focused on making it easier for customers to go solar. The company combines financial and management experience, multiple installation crews, a network of professional services partners, and advanced internal systems to deliver a smooth transition to solar energy at any scale.

Third Sun Solar is a woman-owned business, recognized as a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) through the state of Ohio’s Unified Certification Program. The firm is EDGE-certified and federal HUBzone-certified. The firm is a Certified B-Corporation –third party audited for sustainable and fair business practices.

Contact: 1-877-OWN-SOLAR

Ohio voters favor green energy

Ohio voters favor green energy, efficiency and political candidates who do the same, poll finds

By John Funk, The Cleveland Plain Dealer

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohioans overwhelmingly favor replacing coal-fired power plants with wind farms and solar arrays, and requiring utilities to help customers use less electricity, a poll released Wednesday has found.

The random telephone survey of 600 Ohio voters found:

• That 72 percent favor renewable energy over traditional power plants, with 52 percent strongly in favor.

• That 86 percent of Ohio voters support mandated utility energy efficiency programs, with 49 percent strongly supporting the rules.

• That two-thirds of voters say they would more likely support legislative candidates this fall who promote renewable energy over those who think the state’s utilities should continue to emphasize traditional coal-fired and nuclear power plants.

The Hatfield's Ferry power plant in Pennsylvania has the capacity to generate more than 1,700 megawatts. The power plant's three boilers are fueled with coal. FirstEnergy has closed the plant.

The Hatfield’s Ferry power plant in Pennsylvania has the capacity to generate more than 1,700 megawatts. The power plant’s three boilers are fueled with coal. FirstEnergy has closed the plant.

“The findings present a very clear picture of where Ohioans stand when it comes to energy policy and some of the debates going on in the state legislature,” said David Metz, a principal in the polling firm Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates. Known as FM3, the firm is based in California.

“And relative to other polling we have done in Ohio and around the country, these results are consistent in the strong support that Ohio voters offer for more use of clean energy and greater use of energy efficiency,” said Metz during a news conference.

Ohio Advanced Energy Economy, an advocacy group for efficiency and renewables, commissioned the poll. Ohio Advanced Energy has been battling against a proposal supported by the Republican leadership in the Ohio Senate — Senate Bill 310 — to amend state rules requiring power companies to help customers switch to more efficient equipment and lighting.

The law, which received bipartisan support by all but one lawmaker in 2008, requires utilities to help customers reduce power consumption through energy efficiency by 22 percent by 2025, compared with 2009 levels. And by the same year, the law requires that 12.5 percent of the power sold in the state to have been generated with renewable technologies. The percentages began at less than 1 percent in 2009 and are increasing annually.

But Republican lawmakers, in response to complaints from some large industrial companies and pressure from the utilities, led by FirstEnergy Corp. of Akron, want to freeze things at this year’s levels and then study the issue for three years.

FirstEnergy has been clear that it believes the efficiency rules have cut into normal market growth. Some large industries say it is costing too much in extra charges to fund the mandated programs. Proponents dismiss that complaint, saying the current law allows utilities to halt efficiency programs if they cost more than what they save customers.

Ford and other advocates for keeping the law argue that the bill pending in the Ohio Senate will effectively kill the efficiency and renewable industries that have sprung up since 2009.

“Ohio is home to some 400 advanced energy companies employing 25,000 Ohioans,” said Ted Ford, president and CEO of Ohio AEE. “Ohio’s clean energy law is working. It’s saving money for consumers, creating jobs, and making Ohio competitive. And now, we can demonstrate that the voting public strongly supports it, too.”

But the poll, Ohio Statewide Survey, also found that despite the efforts of energy efficiency advocates like Ford, almost half of the electorate haven’t heard anything at all about what lawmakers are considering. About 20 percent said they were aware of the debate.

Still, almost three-quarters of those polled said they support the current state law that requires utilities to switch to an increasing percentage of renewable energy.

And when asked what percentage of Ohio’s energy should come from wind and solar, on average, Ohioans said they would like to see a majority of the state’s electricity come from renewable sources, as much as 56 percent, said Metz.

“We saw a similar pattern when we asked about energy efficiency, he said. “Most Ohio voters see this (the current law) as something that could benefit them personally.”

“When we ask whether they would be interested in taking advantages of incentives to weatherize their homes, become more energy efficient and not waste energy, 90 percent of voters said that they personally would be interested.